Part 1 of Reed Ingalls’s excellent and long-overdue “An Anarchist History of Buddhism.” Looking forward to more from Reed! Read Part 2: “An Anarchist History of Buddhism: 400 BCE-1800 CE.”

No Selves, No Masters

I dislike the liturgical lists of revolutionary heroes, martyrs, writers, etc. which we rely on to define ideologies and history. But I can’t deny it isn’t useful for legitimating arguments and telling interesting stories. Buddhists who were also anarchists, anarchists who were Buddhists; People inspired by both Buddhism and anarchism but self-identified as one, both, or neither; Buddhists who thought, acted or organized in anarchic ways; Anarchists who practiced, thought or organized in accordance with “Dharma”, etc. The list of people who were both Buddhist and anarchist, and who left behind some written or spoken words which attempted to synthesize the two (and did so well) is exceptionally small.

The following list is a mix of all of the above. There are surely more people out there, but these are who I have learned about so far. Most have had much more extensive biographies done on them, and can even…

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